Memphis Web Programming

Thedosmann's Blog

Windows 11 - privacy exploits

Just Installed Windows 11

No new revelations yet. But I must mention, it seems MS is giving advertising carte blanche.This is but a glimpse of 2022. Extreme intrusions in our everyday life by some company wanting our attention and trying everything to gain access to our very thoughts, your next big decision, where you are located. We find it funny when a commercial comes on and talks about what we were discussing or another type of intrusion, that follows what you spend money on and graphs your buying habits. This is happening now and we just grin and think how odd. 

USPS tracking discovered

 

USPS tracking discovered. The code of your message notice is an ID, attached at the front of a message/text from USPS. The number/ ID is becoming more methodical in its tallies. Yes, they are tallies. As those digits change, there is an indication of either a counting (Accounting) or a timer. As the numbers turn, message by message, the digits to the left start freezing. As the numbers to the left start gaining a greater number of digits it becomes more of a countdown, till all digits stop. Are triggers in number movement tied to a specific total, or position of digits? Finding number patterns might reveal the connection between other related elements. And, with concentrated effort, what those elements are.

 

Jim Atkins

Website Push Notifications

push notifications

Another name for push notifications is just pushy.

THE LOST ART OF CUSTOMER SERVICE

THE LOST ART OF CUSTOMER SERVICE

customer service

40 years in customer service positions, ranging from sales, management, and various retail industries like restaurant, technical, and wholesale occupations have trained me in the knowledge of what customer service is.

The Face of "2020"

NYT- Technology

Techradar

  • Thursday, June 13, 2024 - 06:11
    mark.wilson@futurenet.com (Mark Wilson)

    The text-to-video AI boom has really kicked off in the past few months, with the only downside being that the likes of OpenAI Sora still aren't available for us to try. If you're tired of waiting, a new rival called Dream Machine just landed – and you can take it for a spin right now.

    The essentials

    The logo for Luma AI Dream Machine

    (Image credit: Luma AI)

    Video resolution: 1360x752
    Clip lengths: Five seconds
    Training data: unknown
    Cost: free tier gives you 30 generations per month, paid tiers start from $29.99 / month

    Dream Machine is made by Luma AI, which has previously released an app that helps you shoot 3D photos with your iPhone. Well, now it's turned its attention to generative video, which has a free tier that you can use right now with a Google account – albeit with some caveats.

    The main one is that Dream Machine seems to be slightly overwhelmed at the time of writing. There's currently a banner on the site stating that "generations take 120 seconds" and that "due to high demand, requests will be queued". Our text prompt took over 20 minutes to be processed, but the results (below) are pretty impressive.

    Dream Machine's outputs are more limited in length and resolution compared to the likes of OpenAI's Sora and Kling AI, but it's a good taster of how these services will work. The clips it produces are five seconds long and in 1360x752 resolution. You just type a prompt into its search bar and wait for it to appear in your account, after which you can download a watermarked version. 

    While there was a lengthy wait for the results (which should hopefully improve once initial demand has dropped), our prompt of 'a close-up of a dog in sunglasses driving a car through Las Vegas at night' produced a clip that was very close to what we envisaged. 

    Dream Machine's free plan is capped at 30 generations a month, but if you need more there are Standard (120 generations, $29.99 a month, about £24, AU$45), Pro (400 generations, $99.99 a month, about £80, AU$150) and Premier (2,000 generations, $499.99 a month, about £390, AU$750).

    A taste of AI videos to come

    Like most generative AI video tools, questions remain about exactly what data Luma AI's was trained on – which means that its potential outside of personal use or improving your GIF game could be limited. It also isn't the first free text-to-video tool we've seen, with Runway's Gen 2 model coming out of beta last year.

    The Dream Machine website also states that the tool does have technical limitations when it comes to handling text and motion, so there's plenty of trial-and-error involved. But as a taster of the more advanced (and no doubt more expensive) AI video generators to come, it's certainly a fun tool to test drive.

    That's particularly the case, given that other alternatives like Google Veo currently have lengthy waitlists. Meanwhile, more powerful models like OpenAI's Sora (which can generate videos that are 60-seconds long) won't be available until later this year, while Kling AI is currently China-only.

    This will certainly change as text-to-video generation becomes mainstream, but until then, Dream Machine is a good place to practice (if you don't mind waiting a while for the results).

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